Light Well

Date: 8/22/16
Rendering of Light Well elevation
Student Researcher:Juliana McDonald Faculty Advisor:
Andre LH Baros
 

For this assignment, I had the opportunity to create a healing center through structure. My focus was on providing aid during the grieving process. A key component of my design are a series of light wells located within a group healing space. These tall wells bring in soft, natural light and help soothe visitors. They also have a symbolic purpose, as they represent the individuals who are gone. In my detail model, several aspects of the building’s design are revealed, such as the window assembly, the timber construction, and the layers of a green roof. 

Light Well






Bridging the Gap

Date: 8/22/16
Bridging the gap rending of site and model
Student Researcher:Sokol Binakaj, Benjamin Elmer &Nick Hopkins Faculty Advisor: Allen Harlow

Located between Port Graham and Nanwalek, this complex fills the void and creates a “bridge” between these two remote Alaskan towns. Due to current physical conditions, a new and larger airport has been designed to service both communities, connected by a main road. A community center, restaurant, and yurt-style lodges have been implemented as auxiliary functions to create a destination for tourists and accommodations for locals, in addition to providing further job opportunities for the sustainable economies that have been thriving locally. Future development lots have been articulated and planned for further expansion of the economy.

Bridging the Gap











Tears of the Fallen

Date: 8/22/16
Tears of the Fallen sketch
Student Researcher:Timothy Doherty Faculty Advisor: Andre LH Baros 

Tears of the Fallen is a Studio IV project where the emotion and materiality of a space are the primary focus. It stands as a memorial to the 20 Veterans a day (7,300/year) who take their own lives. 
 
 
 
Six hundred forms stand in formation as water cascades down the stacked ledger stone sides in the morning, giving the space energy, movement, sound, and life.  The stacked ledger stone allows each of the forms to be both uniform in size and shape, yet individual through pattern. 
 
 
 
Throughout the day the water on each form slows to a trickle, dripping down the sides like tears… and then shuts off, representing a suicide. By sunset, all of the forms have fallen silent and the monument now stands silent and lifeless.
 
 
 
The monument is accompanied by a support building that houses a suicide hot line, counseling center, and work place for our Veterans. The suicide hotline is embedded into the ground, a line drawn in the sand stating “no more.” A charred wood facade wraps the counseling center – a material that appears damaged and unusable, yet has actually been made stronger by the flames and is now more resistant to fire, disease, insects, and rotting.
 

Tears of the Fallen


Resident Gallery

Date: 8/22/16
Resident gallery model elevation
Student Researcher:Erica Randle Faculty Advisor: Adam Wagoner

A skeleton in the desert, this massive structure represents the concept of "Well Tempered Grid” by Sol Lewitt, a renowned figure in the Minimal and Conceptual art movements. The building conveys a strong sense of repetition and restraint, which are qualities found in Sol Lewitt’s drawings, paintings and sculptures. The building contains a museum, a studio and a living space, all of which are used by artists studying Sol Lewitt’s work.

Resident Gallery




Agnes Martin Resident Gallery

Date: 8/22/16
Agnes Martin model
Student Researcher:Kellen MacDonald Faculty Advisor: Adam Wagoner

This home was designed for an emerging artist who creates work in the Abstract Expressionist style. The goal was to design a domicile in which the artist can be immersed in the work of abstract painter Agnes Martin, one of the most revered figures in her field. The dwelling has a living area, a work studio, and a gallery space for the emerging artist. It also contains a gallery featuring the work of Agnes Martin, who produced tranquil paintings often composed of grids and stripes. The home’s minimalist aesthetic embodies the spirit of her work. 

Agnes Martin Resident Gallery


Urban Works​

Date: 1/23/17
Urban Works exterior elevation and site rendering
Student Researcher:Elizabeth Fulster & Meryl Smith Faculty Advisor: Amir Alrubaiy

Urban Works is a flexible and creative environment equipped with apartments, studios and a marketplace, allowing the artist, creator or small business owner to live, work and sell all under one roof. Geared towards the creative class, this proposal combines the popular co-working model with residential and commercial space. 


A lot on the corner of 26th and Lawrence Streets was chosen as the location. This site is on the border of the residential Five Points and the industrial RiNo neighborhoods, and sits right in the middle of the various co-work spaces popping up throughout the area. Mindful of these conditions, we decided to stitch the two urban fabrics together by creating a live/work community nested in a modest warehouse


By stacking our three major programmatic elements – retail, working and residential – we addressed the three-story building maximum per the zoning code. Four light wells puncture vertically through the building to allow ample light and exterior windows for all apartments on the third floor. Ground-level glazing and a grand entryway give the building a strong street presence. Up above, balconies enable residents and office workers to enjoy the city's great climate and to feel connected to the lively urban environment.

Urban Works










Urban Artist Collective

Date: 8/21/17
Urban Artist Collective section view
Student Researcher:Genevieve Hampton Faculty Advisor: Brandon Bain

The clients for this residential project are an art dealer and a cellist. There are two additional units for rent that are intended for artists and musicians to temporarily live and work onsite while being mentored by the clients. The intention of this design is to create connections between the creative spaces through light, views, and boundaries by deploying permeable conditions along the procession. In opposition, each living unit restricts light, views, and boundaries to create isolation. Structure is then leveraged to define outdoor spaces and create cohesion between each of the masses.

Urban Artist Collective












Home (All at Once)

Date: 8/21/17
Home all at Once photograph of wood model
Student Researcher:Kyle Newnam Faculty Advisor: Kevin Hirth



The goal of this final assignment was to make isometric drawings and model an existing home, and then make changes to the home while using the system employed by the original architect. I worked with the Fosc House by Pezo von Ellrichshausen, which has several distinctive features. It is a hexagonal shape with many windows of varying sizes. The home is also built around a central staircase connecting all three floors. For the changes, I shifted each of the floors several feet in different directions, trying to keep with the irregularity of the windows and house shape. I left the staircase as the central point of the home.

Home (All at Once)










Finding Balance

Date: 8/21/17
Finding Balance elevation rendering
Student Researcher:Macy Funk Faculty Advisor: Rachel Brown

I have created an experience that is about finding balance within oneself and in the art. My program duels as meditation space and a gallery for three sculptural pieces conceptualized around “the lightness of weight.” I enable visitors to use the art as a tool to enter a focused mentality to gain clarity. Vertical voids facilitate user engagement with the art. Horizontal voids disengage users with surroundings. Horizontal and vertical voids work together to organize the site.  
 
Each sculpture is featured in its own pavilion with an interior space that encourages users to observe and gain understanding of the art and an adjacent exterior space for stationary meditation. The exterior space offers one privileged location where users can sit and view the moment of connection in the art piece and use that focused connection to enter a mental state for mediation. 
 
The pavilions are surrounded by a reflection pool, separating them from primary circulation through the site, privatizing the meditative experience. The pavilions are organized radially; vertical voids in the walls dictated by the art are oriented toward one central location in the primary circulation that allows users to view all three art pieces through the voids from this one position in the site.


Finding Balance












Figure Field

Date: 8/21/17
Figure Field  wood model
Student Researcher:Sonal Desai Faculty Advisor: Adam Wagoner

This assignment began with a series of arrays, and then space was defined with planes and enclosed volumes. Tectonics were applied to the design concept, and evolutions were made each day with new possibilities. 
 
The main idea behind this project was to provide different viewer experiences while moving from the bottom to the top of the space. The incorporation of a defined site into the project further enhanced the experience, with circulation helping form links between a city street and an active alley. 
 
Sections, plans, diagrams, perspectives, and study models have been created to highlight these ideas. A combination of hand-drawn and digital drawings gives the visual experience of being in the space.


Figure Field














Dawe Gallery

Date: 8/21/17
Dawe Gallery exterior collage
Student Researcher:Lucas Homner Faculty Advisor: Heather Morrow 

Dawe Gallery is a small art gallery located on the east side of Cranmer Park. It was designed to house the artwork of Gabriel Dawe, an artist who focuses on light and color. The Dawe Gallery was designed in order to create two unique lighting conditions in each gallery space. One space features a window that runs the length of the southwest wall and the top of the southeast wall to allow direct sunlight to interact with the work in the space. The other space was designed with channel glass and incorporates a large overhanging roof for a gallery space with more ambient lighting conditions. These two different spaces allow for two different experiences when viewing Dawe’s artwork. 

Dawe Gallery








Ascension

Date: 8/21/17
Ascension model overview
Student Researcher:Catalina Maciel Faculty Advisor: Shana S. Cohen

Ascension, a mixed-use development that combines housing spaces with a climbing facility, promotes both community and the importance of recreational areas. The building program provides spaces that are available for use by all users. The centralized circulation encourages the interaction between the different users that enter the building, as well as allows them to experience the sensation of ascension, regardless of whether they are climbing up the tower or walking. With different users in mind, a screen pattern was developed that reflects the interactions of each user within the building. The use of screens and a planar glass system allows ample light into the facility while also helping to diffuse it. Ascension combines activities for all users, creating an inclusive space.

Ascension
















Additive

Date: 8/21/17
Additive parametric drawings
Student Researcher:John Mullison Faculty Advisor: Jennifer Kivett 

Project 2 was entirely centered around the mechanical and tectonic relationships that occur and should be controlled in a structure. The second half of the semester began with an analysis of fields and diagrams; my study is shown here. The 13x13 array of identical empty 1-inch by 1-inch squares was composed and set to follow a  very specific linear advancement, to convey a larger exponential growth illusion. Each row and column (corresponding to horizontal or vertical expansion) changes in a constant flow, yet retains individuality throughout. The assignment grew into a hypothetical Denver structure, with four (or more) stacked arrays to convey the original intent of your motif. 

Additive















Raven's Nest​

Date: 1/22/18
Ravens Nest collage rendering of detail pattern
Student Researcher:Brett Orion Suydam Faculty Advisor: Phil Gallegos

Raven's Nest is a community center and preschool for the Denver Indian Center. The foundational idea of the form and function of the space was that of a bird’s nest: Just as the elders of the community are encouraged to surround and lift their young people, the structures are intended to protect and uplift the children of the preschool. These children are given the roof upon which to play, surrounding an expansive inner-courtyard where drum circles and dancers can rehearse in full view of the children and pow-wows can be held under the sky. The circle has great importance in Native American Cultures across North America. It represents, among other things, how everything is connected, and part of a great circle. This connection is referenced in this space as a reminder to the elders and a lesson to those in the preschool. Raven’s Nest sits as an iconic symbol, in contrast to the neighborhood in which it resides, to stand proudly for North America’s Native American Population, the most invisible minority in the U.S.A.
 

Raven's Nest












Literacy of the Self

Date: 1/22/18
Literacy of the Self photograph of model site view
Student Researcher:Genevieve Hampton Faculty Advisor: Brad Tomecek
 

The prompt for this design was to create a space for literacy within the Denver neighborhood of the Highlands. Instead of creating a traditional library this space creates the opportunity for “Literacy of the Self” which is defined as meditation and self-reflection to encourage focus. The design intention is to create a space that detaches from the sensory inputs of the city, providing a moment for individuals to find isolation of thought, preparing them to confront the flow of data upon reintroduction to the city.

Literacy of the Self








Student Housing Project

Date: 1/15/18
Student Housing Project rendering of elevation view
Student Researcher:Julianna Mestas Faculty Advisor: Kevin Hirth

This project was driven by the need to create housing that accommodated the diverse CU Denver community, emphasizing the inclusion of non-traditional students. With a focus on creating various scales of communal spaces, the variety of units were kept to a minimum. The units themselves are aggregated into four separate buildings that form the shape of a double “L,” each one tiering downward to create rooftop terraces. The two exterior bars are formed out of the inverse of the interior and are elevated off the ground, giving the single loaded corridors equal views into and out of the site. All four buildings are wrapped in a three-part skin system that aids in bringing cohesion to the project while continuing to break up the larger communal spaces into smaller, more private zones.

Student Housing Project










Minimaliteracy

Date: 1/22/18
Minimaliteracy photograph of model section view
Student Researcher:Mitch Deans Faculty Advisor: Juana Gòmez

This is a project located in a gentrified neighborhood, where property values are very high and incomes wealthy. Therefore, this library is designed to teach the philosophy of less is more, and to break the unfulfilling cycle of consumerism. Taking inspiration from the simple, one-room Carnegie library, this project is a celebration of immaterial goods such as community and teamwork.
 
 
 
By creating a single “Great Room” which connects all four floors, utilizing the rooftop space as community gardens, and turning the underutilized Erie St. into a plaza adjacent to a park, this project champions community spaces and the importance of civic participation. The project also uses what would be considered mundane and gritty materials such as concrete, steel, and plywood which are left exposed and placed over more common civic materials like stone and glass curtain walls. This encourages the shedding of status-connoting material possessions and alludes to the building's function.


Minimaliteracy













The Morris Gallery

Date: 8/22/16
The Morris Gallery photograph of architectural model
Student Researcher:Robert Chesnovar Faculty Advisor: Will Koning 

This gallery building was designed to house the work of sculptor Robert Morris, one of the central figures in Minimalism. His sculptures — often composed of repeated geometric forms — force viewers to consider composition and scale as they move around the work. Morris’ ideas were incorporated into the design of this gallery. Pure forms, rhythm, repetition, and scale impact visitors’ interaction with their spacial environment from the moment they enter the site.

The building consists of a gridded set of masses reflecting the modularity and order of the site’s context. These masses are staggered, and direct lines of circulation are broken. This creates a sense of wonderment and discovery as the user moves through the galleries. A mass is added to enclose the circulation space. In return, this becomes an interface between the city and the galleries. 

The galleries and circulation space are elevated, allowing the two main access points of the site to connect. It also enables the ground level to be used as a public space. Outdoor galleries are dropped into the public space, relaying the concept of art as a gift to the public. Voids are carved into the building’s upper levels, which results in visual connections through all levels — from ground plane to the galleries above.


The Jewel

Date: 8/22/16
The Jewel exterior rendering
Student Researcher:Aleksandra Sasha Pokrovskaya & Lyris Sanchez Faculty Advisor: Ranko Ruzic

The goal of the LoDo Historic District is to foster the arts community and revitalize the urban core of downtown Denver. We chose to honor history and context in our design by integrating our building into the surroundings; it became a hidden jewel which we called "The Jewel." 

Our aim is to provide a small performing arts space for aspiring actors in the Denver community. Denver is growing and expanding into a global, creative and diverse city. A black box theatre provides ultimate flexibility to support a variety of performances. The space can also be used for lectures and concerts. 
 
This design explores the relationship between light and dark within programmatic elements. This dynamic space can best be seen in the section drawings.The Black Box Theatre and Cinema are dark environments which allow a fantastical world to emerge. The Atrium provides daylight and a gathering space before the theater. The transcendent light also illuminates the cinema lobby found underground. 
 
Transit systems provide the opportunity to bring together the growing population in Denver. Downtown Denver has seen a revitalization only encouraged by the new light rail system. This type of growth is creating accessible routes for communities outside of the city. Following a careful analysis of the context, we recognized that this neighborhood was missing a small performing arts venue.


Tea House II

Date: 8/22/16
Tea House photograph of architectural model
Student Researcher:Heidy Martinez, Faculty Advisor: Annicia Streete

This project involved three phases that culminated in the design of a Japanese teahouse and garden. In phase I, students designed and crafted plaster models as an introduction to formal and spatial relationships. Next, they explored additive processes through the design and construction of basswood cadence models. Finally, elements from the first two phases were used to generate the teahouse.
 
Students were encouraged to study the Japanese tea ceremony and the specific thresholds, gardens and interior spaces it requires. All aspects of the final design had to be derived in some way from the earlier wood or plaster models. Overall, the project was a means of introducing new students to architectural concepts like spatial hierarchy, procession and solid/void. 
 
For a gently sloping site, I created a low-lying complex with a series of thresholds and gardens leading to a ceremonial tea room. I carved away portions of the site, and elevated others, in order to develop a procession that distances the user from the hustle and bustle of daily life. The main building is a solid block with a partially translucent box projecting off of it. The block contains the tea preparation area while the projecting box serves as the ceremonial tea room. To enter the tea room, guests must step up, through a small doorway, and onto the cantilevered floor plane. This act of leaving the ground behind creates one final separation between the guest and the outside world, putting him or her in the mindset of focusing solely on the tea ceremony.