Shared micro-mobility in Sun Valley

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Alayna OlivasLoera and Ben Gellman, Shared Micromobility in Sun Valley

Planning for Increased Personal Mobility: Sun Valley Neighborhood, Denver, CO
Student Researchers:
 Ben Gellman and Alayna Olivas-Loera
 
Link to Capstone Poster     
Link to Executive Summary 

Increasing the number of trips made with shared micro-mobility vehicles to and from the historically poor Sun Valley neighborhood has the potential to improve social equity outcomes while reducing local and regional air pollution. Denver is currently accepting bids for one or more exclusive micro-mobility provider(s), but existing micro-mobility services are only affordable to people with low-incomes if they enroll in poorly-promoted discount programs offered at the sole discretion of fleet operators. At the same time, Denver is working to improve the number and quality of bicycle facilities, but existing and planned infrastructure doesn’t fully meet the needs of Sun Valley residents. This report provides recommendations for how the EPA should work with the City and County of Denver and local non-profit organizations to fully integrate shared micro-mobility into Denver’s transportation network, and to ensure that communities like Sun Valley share the benefits.


Gilpin county community center concept plan

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Rach Nyhart and Mark Duffy, Gilpin County Community Center Concept Plan

Gilpin County Community Center Concept Plan
Student Researchers:
 Mark Duffy and Rachel Nyhart
 
Link to Capstone Poster    
Link to Executive Summary 

The Gilpin County Community Center Campus Concept Plan provides a range of flexible options that client Gilpin County Parks and Recreation can pursue for the community center campus’ master plan. The Concept Plan Menu items were informed by the goals and findings derived from community engagement practices, background research, and the needs of the county. A Public Engagement Toolkit accompanies the Concept Plan Menu to provide Gilpin County Parks and Recreation with best practices for implementing a future round of engagement. 


E-Scooter ridership trends in Denver, Colorado

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Walter Scheib, E-Scooter Ridership Trends in Denver

Planning in the Digital Public Realm: Understanding E-Scooter Usage and Planning Implications in Denver, Colorado
Student Researcher:
 Walter Scheib
 
Link to Capstone Poster     
Link to Executive Summary 

This capstone project, conducted for the Denver Department of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI), provides an in-depth analysis of Denver's e-scooter travel data from a transportation planning perspective. This research helps address the city’s current e-scooter challenges and provides recommendations for how Denver's planning initiatives should account for growing usage of new micromobility transportation modes. 


Safe Routes for Youth in Westwood

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Val Henao, Safe Routes to School Westwood
Student Researcher:Val Henao

Safe Routes for Youth 2020: Westwood Neighborhood, Denver, CO
 
Link to Capstone Poster
Link to Executive Summary 

Westwood is a diverse, low-income neighborhood in Denver, one of its most pressing community problems is mobility safety, both for pedestrians and bicyclists. The organization Westwood Unidos has as a goal to provide the neighborhood youth safe access to newly improved amenities like parks. Currently, student have limited access to information and knowledge about the safest routes to move around between schools and parks. This project evaluates the most reliable roads by a mix of community mapping with school kids and families, spatial analysis of existing data, and the evaluation of current infrastructure projects, to provide an easily accessible map of safest routes from schools to parks. Mapping mobility safety can be a valuable tool to emulate in communities with similar challenges in Denver and the US.


Teton county short term rental study

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Shelby Jablon, Teton County Short Term Housing Study

Teton County, Idaho and Teton County, Wyoming Short Term Rental Study 
Student Researcher:
 Shelby Jablon
 
Link to Capstone Poster  
Link to Executive Summary 

This study provides an assessment on short-term rental properties within a project area encompassing Teton County Idaho; and Teton County, Wyoming. The report includes research and analysis of case studies and academic literature on short term rentals, an overview of the current conditions in the study area, and provides a summary of existing regulations in the study area. The report culminates in a series of policy and regulatory recommendations for Teton County, Wyoming and Teton County, Idaho. The provided recommendations are intended to protect housing opportunities within the two counties while ensuring tourist accommodations are readily available for visitors to the area. 


Denver south mobility-as-a-service

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Sebastian Montenegro, MAAS South Denver

MAAS: Mobility-as-a-Service Denver South TMA
Student Researcher:
 Sebastian Montenegro
 
Link to Capstone Poster      
Link to Executive Summary 

This project is about rethinking mobility; is about rethinking travel choice for 140,000 workers that commute daily to the Denver South; from DTC all the way to Lone Tree. Mobility as a service instead of mobility as (vehicle) ownership is what drives this project. For achieving it, integrations between all “alternative” modes are reviewed, from transit to ride-hailing, from shuttles to micro-mobility. Resiliency, equity and ultimately liberty, is when we do not have dependence, but when we have choice.


Equity planning lens for Denver

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Sarah Turnback, Equity Planning Lens for Denver

Planning with an Equity Lens: Integrating Equity into Planning and Development in Denver 
Student Researcher:
 Sarah Turnbach
 
Link to Capstone Poster   
Link to Executive Summary 

Equity is an emerging concept in urban planning and development and is a response to patterns of marginalization that persist in our cities. The City and County of Denver has made a commitment to making Denver more equitable. This project serves to aid that commitment by resolving any ambiguity around the concept of equity, through establishing a framework to understand the complexity and potential of equity. This framework, or equity planning lens, identifies four dimensions of action necessary to realize equity, and identifies best practices for each dimension.  


Indicators of displacement: Globeville Elyria Swansea

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Sarah Dunmire, Indicators of Displacement: Globeville Elyria Swansea

Indicators of Displacement: Globeville Elyria Swansea
Student Researcher:
 Sarah Dunmire
 
Link to Capstone Poster      
Link to Executive Summary 

Globeville and Elyria Swansea (GES) are historically isolated and marginalized neighborhoods in northern Denver. Recently, there has been new and planned development in the neighborhoods impacting property values. Residents are beginning to feel this increased economic pressure and are fearful of being displaced. An in-depth analysis of demographic, housing, employment, and property valuations are used to identify causes and factors that can influence or already are influencing displacement in GES. 


St. Vrain Creek restoration assessment

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Sam Lasher, St. Vrain Creek Restoration Assessment

St. Vrain Creek Restoration Assessment
Student Researcher:
 Samantha Lasher
 
Link to Capstone Poster      
Link to Executive Summary

On September 12, 2013 17 inches of rain fell across the Colorado Front Range and triggered a 500-year flood along the St. Vrain Creek in the small town of Lyons. Homes, businesses, and roads were damaged and all residents had to evacuate. Most of Lyons has recovered, with the exception of a few places, such as the site located at 4652 Ute Highway. This project will highlight how the Town of Lyons and the site’s owner, Generator Real Estate, LLC, can adequately restore this portion of the St. Vrain Creek while integrating resiliency and environmental concerns and identify ways in which different restoration strategies will affect future development on the site. Additionally, general river restoration resources are provided for the Town of Lyons to use in the event of future floods.


Historic preservation and sustainability guidelines

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Reilly Rosbotham, Historic Preservation and Sustainability Guidelines

Historic Preservation and Sustainability Guidelines for Colorado Main Streets
Student Researcher:
 Reilly Rosbotham
 
Link to Capstone Poster      
Link to Executive Summary 

Historic preservation and sustainability often go hand-in-hand. This project helps inform public entities, non-profits, property owners, and tenants on the best practices for preserving historic Colorado Main Streets sustainably. These recommendations range from large-scale interventions to much smaller projects, all the way from transitioning an entire community to solar energy to minor maintenance and repair on historic buildings. The guidebook includes a wide array of resources to help users achieve their desired outcomes, showing that projects incorporating both preservation and sustainability can be practically and financially feasible. Each guideline and resource is tailored to be most useful to people who are passionate about the life and vibrancy of small Colorado communities.


Shady Lane mobile home park development

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Philip Strom, Shady Lane Mobile Home Park Development

A Bright Future: Shady Lane Mobile Home Park Development
Student Researcher:
 Philip Strom
 
Link to Capstone Poster     
Link to Executive Summary 

This project explores the future of an existing mobile home park by providing development options for the owner in collaboration with Town of Lyons. Affordable housing is disappearing across Boulder County and the Town of Lyons is particularly challenged due to lack of developable area and loss of housing after a 2013 flood disaster. This project explores opportunities to increase housing capacity at an existing mobile home park while limiting displacement of the current community as well as expanding on economic development opportunities for the Town.


Stormwater management for the Sheridan-Quincy trail

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Nicole Bush, Urban Public Stormwater Management

Urban Public Stormwater Management for the Sheridan-Quincy Trail
Student Researcher:
 Nicole Bush
 
Link to Capstone Poster | Coming Soon     
Link to Executive Summary | Coming Soon

The Urban Public Stormwater Managementfor the Sheridan-Quincy TrailCapstone explores the widespread urban environmental challenge of stormwater management and provides site-specific innovative and sustainable solutions to reduce localized flooding, improve ecological health of a flood zone, and educate the next generation of environmental stewards. This is accomplished through using nature as the construction material. Through green infrastructure, bioengineering, educational, and planning methods, this project addresses a pressing and costly environmental challenge while bolstering a public asset. 


Opportunity Idaho Springs: Enhancing community engagement

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Natalie Floyd, Opportunity Idaho Springs

Opportunity Idaho Springs: Enhancing Opportunities for Community Engagement
Student Researcher:
 Natalie Floyd
 
Link to Capstone Poster    
Link to Executive Summary

Opportunity Idaho Springs is a project focused on understanding how community engagement works in communities, particularly smaller communities. Community engagement is essential for communities to be able to adapt to change in a responsible manner. Through this project, community engagement is explored at general, small-scale, and contextual levels. This tiered analysis of community engagement provides the opportunity to provide recommendations to my client and the City of Idaho Springs regarding their ongoing community engagement efforts. 


Teton county GIS analysis

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
McKenzie Metzger, Teton County GIS Analysis

97% A GIS Analysis of Teton County, Wyoming
Student Researcher:
 Mckenzie Metzger
 
Link to Capstone Poster    
Link to Executive Summary 

Public land is widely understood to comprise 97% of Teton County, Wyoming and many community members believe the remaining 3% of private land should be developed for residential and commercial use; however, the public and private proportions are oversimplified statistics that can confuse the geography of  the valley of Jackson (Jackson Hole) and the County.

This project calculated and mapped ownership, land use, and terrain in the County to determine where development can realistically occur. The results revealed that historic land fragmentation patterns and natural terrain constrained development in Jackson Hole and development is not feasible outside of the valley because the surrounding land is publicly owned. Although there are vacant residential and commercial parcels in Jackson Hole, the amount of developable land is far less than 3%. The maps generated from this analysis can be used as tools to help community members understand the geography of the County so they make the most informed decisions on how to plan for growth and development while protecting open space and natural habitats.


Missing middle housing in Centennial

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Matthew Siegle, Missing Middle Housing Options for Centennial

The Missing Middle: Housing Options for Centennial
Student Researcher:
 Matthew Siegle
 
Link to Capstone Poster   
Link to Executive Summary 

Centennial is facing declining home affordability and a mismatch between the types of housing that residents need and what currently exists. With detached single-family units comprising 77% of the community’s housing, younger households are being priced out of the market while aging residents struggle to find homes that meet their lifestyle needs. Middle housing, which includes a variety of home types ranging from ADUs to mixed-use buildings, offers a likely solution. This report examines the benefits of middle housing, local conditions that affect implementation, and specific actions the City can take to encourage its development.


Impacts on natural resources around SH-285

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Mallory Redmon, Impacts on Natural Resources around SH-285

Understanding Human Impacts on Natural Resources from Recreational and Land Development Activities in the 285 Corridor
Student Researcher:
 Mallory Redmon
 
Link to Capstone Poster     
Link to Executive Summary 

In this project, the author examined human impacts on natural resources in the SH-285 corridor. Four watersheds in the South Platte Sub-basin defined the study zone, and the author studied human impacts over five subject areas (water, vegetation, wildlife, development and recreation). She then created a series of maps and was able to determine the natural resource areas of concern. This geospatial method of recreation ecology assesses natural resources and is used by land managers and planners across the country.


Multi-generational housing assessment

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Lucy Rollins, Multi-generations Housing Affordability

Multi-Generational Housing Affordability and Accessory Dwelling Unit Assessment
Student Researcher:
 Lucy Rollins
 
Link to Capstone Poster     
Link to Executive Summary 

Homebuilders are beginning to construct single-family houses that include an internal suite and calling these multi-generational homes. The internal suite includes all of the elements of an attached ADU, but, at present, is not considered a second dwelling unit in California. In addition, homeowners of these types of houses report providing the suite to family members and others at no cost, creating a new type of affordable housing in suburban development. This Capstone explores this home type and presents the argument for considering multi-generational second units as attached ADUs so that California jurisdictions can count them as affordable second units toward the housing allocation given to them by the state.


Sunrise zoning and land use analysis

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Kate Stefani, Sunrise Zoning and Land Use Analysis

A New Horizon for the Sunrise Neighborhood: A Comprehensive Analysis of Zoning and Land Use
Student Researcher:
 Kate Stefani 

Link to Capstone Poster     
Link to Executive Summary 

The Sunrise Neighborhood in Greeley, Colorado has a significant number of residential nonconforming uses due to zoning and land use discrepancies. The nonconforming status of these properties limits their ability to alter, expand, or rebuilt. Although traditional zoning theory states that nonconformities should be eliminated over time, the City of Greeley recognizes the importance of these homes to this well-established neighborhood, and is seeking ways to maintain them while allowing the same developmental rights as properly zoned homes in the area. Several options to address this issue were researched and recommendations were made for the City of Greeley to consider. 


Museum of Denver initial feasibility study

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Jason Hanson, Museum of Denver Initial Feasibility Study

Museum of Denver Initial Feasibility Study
Student Researcher:
 Jason Hanson

Link to Capstone Poster    
Link to Executive Summary 

Nearly every community in Colorado has its own museum. Except Denver. Is it time for that to change? With case studies as benchmarks and a survey of potential visitors, this initial feasibility study provides a basis for assessing the viability of a new Museum of Denver and imagining what it could be. The initial findings suggest that broad community support exists for a Museum of Denver, offer guidance on interpretive themes Denverites would like to explore through the museum, and concluded that the Museum of Denver could be a successful addition to the city's already-rich cultural fabric.


Nonprofits affordable housing guide

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
James Russell, Nonprofit Affordable Housing Guide

Racking the Weight: A Nonprofits’ Guide to Lifting a Community’s Affordable Housing Stock
Student Researcher:
 James Russell

Link to Capstone Poster
Link to Executive Summary 

This guide is just a light step into the complexity and diverse range of opportunities that await affordable housing developers. We will explore three equally important ways nonprofits can best impact the number of available low-income “affordable” units. First, nonprofits can take on the challenge of bringing new affordable units into the market. Second, nonprofits can work to convert existing market-rate buildings and repurpose it for affordable housing. The third option is for the nonprofit to become advocates and to institute programs to help at-risk residents keep living in their current home.  The guide will discuss each of these in turn and provide examples of nonprofit organizations and development projects in each category for nonprofits to further research and potentially emulate.